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Welcome to our lab

Sam, Chris and Jules - the Grommets

Sam, Chris and Jules – the Grommets

Grommet Laboratories is a father-daughters collaboration that explores the interface between electronics, music and living things. The lab’s first project, which debuted at Maker Faire 2011, was the Slugophone—an insect-operated synthesizer. They followed this up in 2012 with the Musiquarium, an aquatic soundscape mediated by fish. The Grommets (Chris Losee and his daughters, Sam & Jules) are intrigued by home-made electronic gadgets, biomorphic sculpture and beam robotics. The laboratory recently acquired a raspberry pi, which will help further their investigations into physical computing.

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About Chris Losee

Chris Losee is a farmer, writer and maker living in the mid-Hudson Valley region of New York State. He's also one-third of the Grommet Laboratories team: a father-daughters collaboration exploring the interface between electronics, sound and vision, and living things. The lab’s "Slugophone" project -- an insect-operated synthesizer -- was featured at World Maker Faire 2011. They followed this up in 2012 with the Musiquarium -- an aquatic soundscape mediated by fish -- which won two blue ribbon Editors Choice awards. Chris, Sam & Jules are intrigued by home-made electronic gadgets, biomorphic sculpture and beam robotics. The laboratory's recently-acquired raspberry pi is expected to help further their investigations into physical computing.

2 responses to “Welcome to our lab

  1. Hello my name is Scott. I was wondering if you gave any thought to connecting a small solar panel to this in order to recharge the battery? Would that be very hard?

    • Hi Scott! I presume you’re thinking about the pi power battery? A solar battery charger would be a great way to maintain charge on a battery that’s on much of the time, or in a remote location. I’m not an expert in that area, but I know that a charger usually needs to supply a voltage that’s a bit higher than normal battery voltage — so for an 18V battery, maybe 20 Volts? That means you’d have to design a solar panel able to deliver that voltage — a good challenge! Or you could switch to a more common 12V rechargeable battery and use an off-the-rack solar “battery maintainer”. You could power the pi either way; I chose the 18V battery because that’s what I had, so it was cheap… Good luck, and please let me know how it works out!

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